You are not alone in missing the Soviet Union

Public domain photo of former Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, who passed away on March 5, 1953.

Public domain photo of former Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, who passed away on March 5, 1953.

Wait. I didn’t say I was part of that group. But there are people who miss the Soviet Union.

The Washington Post has the story.

The last Soviet leader, Mikhail Gorbachev, recently gave interviews in which he criticized Western inaction over the collapse of the Soviet Union and lambasted the “treachery” of those who enabled it. Vladimir Putin, Russia’s leader in one form or another for more than 16 years, has called the fall of the Soviet Union the “greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the century.”

Perhaps what’s more surprising, however, is that among the general public, who often suffered the most under the Soviet Union, there is perhaps a lingering nostalgia for it.

Look at data from the independent polling firm Levada and you’ll see that the percentage of Russians who regretted the Soviet collapse has dropped below 50 percent only once since 1992: in 2012, when it hit 49 percent. In the most recent polling, about 56 percent of Russians say they regret its fall.

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This entry was posted in 20th century, Soviet Union, the importance of history. Bookmark the permalink.

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